RASC - St. John's Centre
Members Photos

Images of "M42, M31 & the Pleaides"
Photographed by Tim Caruk November 12th & 14th, 2010
 

A photo of  the "Orion Nebula" (M42), in Orion, photographed from St. John's  on November 12, 2010 by Tim Caruk.

The Orion Nebula region, seen here, is the sword in the constellation of Orion. It can be seen with the unaided eye in a reasonably dark sky, however a telescope reveals a considerable amount of detail. Hydrogen gas appears as red and blue nebula is mainly a reflection of local star light. 

The total exposure of this image is about 50 minutes.  I took it from my backyard through a 110 diameter ED scope with a Nikon D5000 SLR camera.

Click image for full original photo.

A photo of  the "Andromeda Galaxy" (M31), in Andromeda, photographed from St. John's  on November 14, 2010 by Tim Caruk.

The Andromeda galaxy is by far the largest and closest spiral galaxy to our own and is the farthest object visible to the unaided eye in a dark sky. It spans the size of 6 full moons as viewed from Earth. At about 2.5 million light years distant it contains about 1 trillion stars. The image I took shows dark lanes of dust and groups of stars in the outer spiral arms. The central core is an area of dense concentrations of stars spiralling around what is believed to be a black hole.  The image is an exposure totalling about 70 minutes taken with a Nikon D5000 connected to a 110 ED scope.

Click image for full original photo.

A photo of  the "Andromeda Galaxy" (M31), in Andromeda, photographed from St. John's  on November 14, 2010 by Tim Caruk.

Close-up view of the central core of  the Andromeda galaxy shown above.  The central core is an area of dense concentrations of stars spiralling around what is believed to be a black hole.  The image is an exposure totalling about 70 minutes taken with a Nikon D5000 connected to a 110 ED scope.

Click image for full original photo.

A photo of  the "Pleaides, in Taurus, photographed from St. John's  on November 12, 2010 by Tim Caruk.

The Pleaides are a cluster of stars visible to the unaided eye in the constellation Taurus. The bluish stars are around 1/50 the age of our Sun at about 100 million years old.The seven brightest stars, known as the Seven Sisters from ancient mythology, are easy to see.  However the faint inter-stellar dust they illuminate can only be seen in long exposures. I took this image using a 110 ED scope at F7 and a Nikon D5000 SLR camera, with a total exposure of about 30 minutes.

Click image for full original photo.

 

 

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