RASC - St. John's Centre
Members Photos

 
 
 

Image of NGC7023 the Iris Nebula and NGC7293 the Helix Nebula taken from Mt. Pearl, Newfoundland.
Photographed by Dave Newbury - October 5 & 8, 2015

 
 

Iris Nebula NGC7023  Taken October 8, 2015 @ Mount Pearl, Newfoundland. Equipment - C11 on EQ8, Canon 6D (modified) and LPS-P2 filter. Autoguiding using ED80, QHY5LII-mono and PHD2. Images captured with assistance of BackYardEOS, stacked and processed in PixInsight. Stack of 18, 240-second subs @ 3200iso (72min total integration time).

This is a "reflection" nebula. Light is reflecting off a molecular dust cloud surrounding a bright central star. The blue colour comes from a combination of the stars natural colour as well as absorption of other colours as it reflects off the surrounding dust particles (similar to why our sky is blue).

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Helix Nebula NGC7293. Images taken over two nights October 5 and 8, 2015 @ Mount Pearl, Newfoundland. Equipment - C11 on EQ8, Canon 6D (modified) and LPS-P2 filter. Autoguided using ED80, QHY5LII-mono and PHD2. Images captured with assistance of BackYardEOS, stacked and processed in PixInsight. Stack of 25, 240-second subs @ 3200iso (100min total integration time). This one was a challenge as it is relatively low for our northern latitude sky.

This nebula is commonly known as the "Eye of God" or more recently the "Eye of Sauron". It is a "planetary nebula" (PN). PN's are the result of a red giant star collapsing on itself and then exploding. This expels an expanding glowing shell of ionized gas - which is often quite colourful. Planetary nebula have nothing to do with planets - perhaps named that way because in early telescopes many looked like planets (small, round but not pin-point like a star)

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